you're reading...

Art in Fremont

Can your neighborhood maintain its character? Historic Seattle invites responses at April 8 meeting and online responses

Seattle Councilmember Tom Rasmussen asks Seattle to weigh in on ways to preserve the character of our Seattle neighborhoods even as they change rapidly. Some neighborhoods have design guidelines, though Fremont’s were never adopted as part of our neighborhood plan. Do design guidelines make a significant difference? What else might, to keep Fremont quirky and artistic? Three public meetings are scheduled:

  • Georgetown, March 23, 6:00 pm, Georgetown Campus, South Seattle Community College, 6737 Corson Ave S, Seattle, WA 98108 (meet in multi-purpose room C122 in Gene J. Colin Education Hall)
  • West Seattle, April 7, 6:00 pm, High Point Center, 6920 34th Ave SW, Seattle, WA 98126
  • North Seattle, April 8, 6:00 pm, Phinney Ridge Neighborhood Association, 6532 Phinney Ave N, Seattle, WA 98103

Here’s the invitation from Historic Seattle and Eugenia Woo:

Historic Seattle is helping the City of Seattle get the word out about neighborhood conservation districts. We know many you are concerned about the issue of neighborhood character. The City is developing a planning tool that can help our neighborhoods grow and retain unique character. We encourage you to attend one of the upcoming public meetings to learn more and share your thoughts with the City.

Neighborhood Conservation Districts!

Preserve your neighborhood’s character amidst booming development

Does your neighborhood have strong character that should be preserved, but isn’t eligible or appropriate for historic district status?

Councilmember Tom Rasmussen is holding a series of Neighborhood Conservation District (NCD) public meetings to gather resident input about establishing a program in Seattle. NCDs can be best described as a hybrid between Seattle’s Landmark Review Districts and the Design Review Program where unique neighborhoods can help set architectural style, square footage requirements, or other design elements. More information about neighborhood conservation districts may be found on Councilmember Rasmussen’s website.

Three public meetings are scheduled:

Georgetown, March 23, 6:00 pm, Georgetown Campus, South Seattle Community College, 6737 Corson Ave S, Seattle, WA 98108 (meet in multi-purpose room C122 in Gene J. Colin Education Hall)

West Seattle, April 7, 6:00 pm, High Point Center, 6920 34th Ave SW, Seattle, WA 98126

North Seattle, April 8, 6:00 pm, Phinney Ridge Neighborhood Association, 6532 Phinney Ave N, Seattle, WA 98103

For more information, please contact Evan Clifthorne, Councilmember Tom Rasmussen’s Office, evan.clifthorne@seattle.gov or (206) 684-8808.

And from Councilmember Rasmussen’s site, this brief overview:

A neighborhood conservation district is an area with clear and consistent character defined by geographical boundaries. Typically a neighborhood conservation district board is established that includes neighborhood representatives and design professionals to make recommendations and decisions consistent with the authorities delegated to it by the city’s elected officials. The districts are established with the specific intention of conserving the neighborhood character of the designated districts, and would be individually established by a vote of the Seattle City Council.

A conservation district would provide guidelines, support and potential incentives for the conservation of important neighborhood buildings and design characteristics, but would not be as prescriptive as the landmark and special review districts that the city currently uses.  More here. 

 

Discussion

No comments yet.

Post a Comment